Law News & Legal News

Ladies and gentlemen!

Welcome to our INDALAW website, your legal assistant.

This is a big internet magazine about world law news and legal news.

USA, UK, EU juridical news are collected here to keep you up to date with the latest setting of laws and regulations in the Unites States of America, United Kingdom, Australia, European Union, China. American, european and chinese people will discover lots of useful important messages here from their state and private authorities, which they failed to know from other resources.

Especially follow our sum up topics like top 10 law news of the year, top 100 legal news of the year and others.

Law newsLegal news

  •  

    Britain risks creating new Guantánamo in Syria, says rights group

    17:09, February 26 2 0

    Britain risks creating “a new Guantánamo” in Syria by leaving Shamima Begum and others like her stranded in Syrian detention camps, it has been claimed, after the supreme court rejected Begum’s appeal against a decision to revoke her UK citizenship.
  •  

    Drug reforms must consider the wider issues

    12:16, February 26 5 0

    Dr Kojo Koram’s powerful opinion piece (Enlightened drug reforms are sweeping the US. Why is Britain so far behind?, 25 February) highlights how decriminalisation of drug possession in the US may be a mechanism to address disparities in the UK criminal justice system, and help to change public attitudes towards people who use drugs.
  •  

    Police watchdog castigates forces over use of stop and search

    20:37, February 25 12 0

    Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary has castigated police forces over stop and search, saying that 35 years after the power was introduced they were still unable to explain why black people are more likely to be targeted.
  •  

    The Guardian view on the crimes of Assad’s regime: slow, uncertain justice

    16:23, February 25 8 0

    Ten years on from the uprising against his brutal regime, Bashar al-Assad still reigns supreme, with his cronies around him, committing the same crimes. Hundreds of thousands have died. The cash extorted from the families of detainees is likely to be cushioning the impact of sanctions for the elite, a report recently suggested. The contrast between the enormity of the atrocities, and the absence of a route towards accountability for those at the top, could hardly be more glaring or painful.
  •  

    Enlightened drug reforms are sweeping the US. Why is Britain so far behind?

    08:56, February 25 22 0

    In 1942, the American political scientist Quincy Wright published a lengthy book about how to organise the world beyond endless wars. A Study of War cemented Wright’s reputation as an influential liberal thinker of the early 20th century. But Wright would help bring about a new type of endless war in his time. He was one of the first major voices to call for what would later be known as the “war on drugs”. As early as 1924, Wright argued that the use of drugs “for purposes other than medicinal or scientific” is an “evil”. While working as an adviser to the state department, Wright advocated for the US to lead a global assault against drugs.
  •  

    Australia’s move to tame Facebook and Google is just the start of a global battle

    13:52, February 24 22 0

    Facebook and Google have become accustomed to an open world of information on which to build their closed ecosystems. Not any more. Australia is proceeding with a new media code that will force platforms to pay for news and bargain with news publishers. While Google has complied, Facebook called the regulators’ bluff by banning Australian news from its platform, before reaching a deal with the Australian government that allows it to avoid the new code, but only if it signs agreements with key publishers.
  •  

    How many principles have we scrapped since 9/11? A new Guantánamo film reminds us

    08:57, February 24 27 0

    I started work at Liberty, the civil rights advocacy group, the day before the September 11 attacks. I recall the feeling of doom: it is important to remember the devastating loss of life on that day – 3,000 people from all over the world – in an event that is now often subject to denialist conspiracy theories. Soon after, British ministers were contemplating far-reaching “security measures” against the background of fear that the same could happen in London. Surveying the entire population was a price worth paying, they said.