Law News & Legal News

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This is a big internet magazine about world law news and legal news.

USA, UK, EU juridical news are collected here to keep you up to date with the latest setting of laws and regulations in the Unites States of America, United Kingdom, Australia, European Union, China. American, european and chinese people will discover lots of useful important messages here from their state and private authorities, which they failed to know from other resources.

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Law newsLegal news

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    Don’t blame lawyers for their Brexit bonanza

    04:15, July 16 18 0

    Some good Brexit news at last: lawyers are rolling in it. Profits at “magic circle” (that is, elite) law firms were reported to be a remarkable £2.6bn in 2017. While many have worried about the dampening effect of Brexit on business activity, lawyers have been in demand, working on mergers and acquisitions designed to shore up companies’ positions, and advising business leaders on the almost infinite variety of outcomes that Brexit might throw up.
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    At last, a law that could have stopped Blair and Bush invading Iraq

    01:19, July 16 19 0

    Tuesday is a red-letter day for international law: from then on, political and military leaders who order the invasion of foreign countries will be guilty of the crime of aggression, and may be punishable at the international criminal court in The Hague. Had this been an offence back in 2003, Tony Blair would have been bang to rights, together with senior numbers of his cabinet and some British military commanders. But if that were the case, of course, they would not have gone ahead; George W Bush would have been without his willing UK accomplices.
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    In Your Defence by Sarah Langford – review

    03:06, July 15 17 0

    This is no typical legal memoir. Against the backdrop of a justice system in crisis, Sarah Langford guides readers through 11 cases demonstrating the workings and failings of the underfunded, overburdened criminal and family courts, laying bare the impact of successive funding cuts that undermine justice for victims and defendants and severely reduce access to the family courts for those without means.